Infographics

scale-up

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personas

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PNG map of the QIC Programme

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framework-evaluation-infographic_final

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arch-ethnography-infographic

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8 Challenges of Implementing Change_ARCH Infographic_web

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White Papers & Working Papers

Overview
Despite the proliferation and use of digital health technologies relating to diet and nutrition amongst the general population, there is limited evidence regarding how they are perceived and their specific use in clinical practice by dietitians. The use of digital and connected health tools in dietetics such as diet tracker, advice applications and video consultation tools have the potential to enable healthcare professionals to reach a larger number of patients and to improve health care and health outcomes. As part of an exploratory connected health research project, the overall aim was to explore what access those in the dietetic field had to these types of technologies and how they viewed the use of digital health technology in practice.

To investigate the practices and attitudes to digital health technology use among dietitians in Ireland, an exploratory survey study was disseminated to dietitian members of the Irish Nutrition and Dietetics Institute (INDI). In total, 179 dietitians from all over Ireland completed the survey.

Authors
Dr Claire Timon (ARCH)

Publication Date
June 2018

Link
Read the Full White Paper: The practices and attitudes relating to digital health technology use among dietitians in Ireland

Overview
In recent years, numerous pharmacy focused apps have emerged onto the Irish market. Several hospital pharmacy departments have developed hospital antimicrobial apps, providing staff with easy access to hospital specific guidelines for the treatment of infections in inpatients. In addition, applications have become available which facilitate patient repeat prescription ordering, automatic refill of prescriptions, patient reminders, patient pharmacist communication and patient access to their medication record held on the pharmacies dispensing software. However, adoption of these apps by both pharmacies and patients thus far has been variable. In order to gain insight into how pharmacists are using pharmacist-driven applications, and how they feel such technologies can best contribute to pharmacy practice and patient care, ARCH conducted a survey of community pharmacists usage and perceptions of these apps.

Authors
Claire Sweeney (ARCH)

Publication Date
15th May 2018

Link
Read the Full White Paper: Irish pharmacists’ attitudes usage and attitudes towards the of digital applications

Overview
Irish research indicates that one in four people will experience a mental health problem at some point in their lives (Mental Health Ireland, 2018). Presently, a gap in the Irish health service exists between the demand and supply of MH services, with reports of wait times of between 16-80 weeks (Corcran & Byrne, 2017). There is a growing body of evidence supporting the effectiveness of Connected Mental Health (CMH) as an innovative mode of treatment and/or support for a wide variety of MH difficulties, capable of bridging this gap between supply and demand. Within the Irish context however, little is known about the level of Technology Acceptance of CMH. There are few Irish companies operating in the CMH space, even though this segment of the Connected Health industry is growing rapidly internationally. This study aims to collect data on Irish adult’s acceptance of CMH and to initiate a conversation with Industry on the opportunities and challenges of developing CMH technologies.

Authors
Dr Louise Rooney, Dr Marcella McGovern & Ms Shelby Unger (ARCH)

Publication Date
15th May 2018

Link
Read the Full White Paper: Mental Health & Technology Whitepaper

Overview
Adherence to medication, particularly for chronic illness, has traditionally been poor, occurring only about 50% of the time. Given that the prevalence of chronic illness has never been higher, the potential effects of non-adherence are vast. Non-adherence is thought to be the cause of over 300,000 deaths in Europe and America, while costing over €300 billion, annually. Thus interventions aimed at reducing non-adherence are of critical importance.

From a behavioural perspective, common predictors of non-adherence include procrastination, forgetfulness, side effects, the challenge of managing multiple prescriptions, misunderstanding disease, imperfect drug regimens, cognitive impairments, and a reduced sense of urgency due to asymptomatic conditions. Adherence decreases as the complexity, cost, and duration of the regimen increases.

Technology via eHealth has a potentially significant role in addressing some of these behavioural issues. This White Paper focuses on some eHealth behavioural intervention-types, and provides some recommendations of ways to develop such interventions.

Authors
Dr. Daniel Regan (ARCH)

Publication Date
27th July 2016

Link
Read the Full White Paper: Medication Adherence-Improvements via eHealth Behaviour Change Interventions

Overview
Medication adherence is one of the exceptional areas of health care policy regarded as a win-win for patients, providers, and payers alike. It signifies a remarkable opportunity for return on investment in an era of economic austerities and spiralling healthcare costs. Therefore, positioning of strategies for medication adherence optimisation is rapidly burgeoning and reporting effective outcomes and cost-savings. While future use of health-related mobile applications is expected to increase in various healthcare settings, pharmacists are uniquely positioned in this scenario to leverage new technology to drive effective adherence strategies. In this whitepaper, we will discuss medication adherence with smart phone apps with a particular emphasis on pharmacy-driven apps, how these are perceived by patients for their benefits, barriers and desired features.

Authors
Dr. Anushree Priyadarshini (ARCH) and Dr. Maria Quinlan (ARCH)

Link
Read the Full White Paper here.

Overview
How can Connected Health technology solutions, which have yet to gain traction in economically developed markets, unlock their market potential worldwide?

This Working Paper discusses issues around technology transfers in healthcare, unpacking the background to tech transfers and understanding how technology change takes place in today’s world. Moreover, the paper reflects on the need to transfer much more than patents and licenses to drive social innovation and thus unlock Connected Health’s true market potential.

Authors
Dr. Nicole Gross and Professor Susi Geiger

Link
Read the full Working Paper here.

Reports

Overview
This project examined how current patient recruitment strategies in connected health research could be improved. The following research question was explored “What are the key elements to effective and efficient patient recruitment in connected health?”. The term effective refers to how successful a recruitment strategy is and the term efficient refers to the time and resources it takes to plan and execute recruitment from the beginning of a project to the end. It is expected that this document will be used by ARCH researchers to support their recruitment efforts in future projects.

Authors
Shelby Unger and Brenda Reginatto (ARCH)

Link
Read the Full Report here.

Overview
While the idea of electronic health (eHealth) is quite novel to many in healthcare, the principles and practices which underpin it have been well documented over the years. Using information and communications technology (ICT), eHealth strives to deliver healthcare and clinical pathways in a more efficient and safe manner. EHRs are a component of eHealth which provides clinicians with a platform in which they can view, share, manage and monitor the health records of their patients. The introduction of EHRs is a key component in eHealth Ireland’s implementation strategy. This report summarises the key findings from the public consultation regarding the benefits and barriers of implementing Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in Ireland.

Authors
Andrew Staunton and Dr. Maria Quinlan (ARCH)

Link
Read the Full Report here.

Executive Summaries

Initial Project DeliverablesCore-2015-CH1-D3 A remote trial is a trial supported by digital technologies that takes place in a non-clinical setting in order to place individuals, rather than investigative sites, at the centre of the research process. Remote trials have the potential to make clinical research participation more accessible and convenient for “hard-to-reach” groups, such as older adults with impaired mobility and cognition. In order to determine the feasibility of this model, it is essential to understand operational and technical challenges associated with remote data collection as well as the burden this may place on the stakeholders involved. – Click here for an Executive Summary of this report.
Initial Project DeliverablesCore-2015-CH1-D3 How innovation-ready are healthcare organisations in Ireland for eHealth – views from the HSEs CCIOs – Click here for an Executive Summary of this report.
Brief Description: This is a study on patient recruitment and retention in clinical trials (CTs). The context of the study is preparation for potential technology enabled CTs which when they reach their potential will provide, due to higher quality information, an improved understanding of the drug/therapy efficacy while also reducing the significant cost of trials.A greater understanding of the issues relating to patient recruitment and retention in CTs will inform the design of future technology enabled CT services.Executive Summary to follow.